For or against e-books?

Jacqueline Rush Lee, Little Red Book (Devotion Series), 2008

In an article for the New York Review of Books “E-books can’t burn”, Tim Parks defends electronic books.

“Interviewed after winning England’s Costa Prize for Literature in late January, the distinguished novelist Andrew Miller remarked that while he assumed that soon most popular fiction would be read on screen, he believed and hoped that literary fiction would continue to be read on paper. In his Man Booker Prize acceptance speech last October, Julian Barnes made his own plea for the survival of printed books. Jonathan Franzen has also declared himself of the same faith. At the university where I work, certain professors, old and young, will react with disapproval at the notion that one is reading poetry on a Kindle. It is sacrilege.

Are they right?”

Read the full article here.
And what do you think?
 
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Posted on February 16, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Interesting topic.

    I don’t mind ebooks for their portability and availability, but a down side of buying ebooks by Australian authors is many are very expensive compared to prices overeseas. The exception is when the authors’ books have also been published outside Australia.

    Thankfully PanMacmillan yesterday launched Momentum Press, its ebook-only imprint, which is committed to cheaper prices, so maybe other publishers will follow suit. If I’m going to pay nearly the same amount for an ebook as I do for a printed copy, I’d prefer to buy print – or find a copy in the library.

  2. I love to read and I keep most of my books so when I say I’m all for ebooks, think of all the shelf space I’m saving.

    On the other hand, there is nothing quite like holding a new book, snuggling into a chair and disappearing for a while.

    I feel it comes down to….at least they’re reading.

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